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Lux Research - Oil and Gas Scenarios: Surviving the Energy Transition

Oil and Gas Scenarios: Surviving the Energy Transition

In this webinar, we presented five distinct strategies that O&G companies can adopt to remain dominant in energy while meeting their goals of carbon neutrality.

Presenter: Runeel Daliah, Principal Analyst at Lux Research

The oil and gas (O&G) industry is the cornerstone of our global energy system. However, the world is moving away from fossil resources. The International Energy Agency’s net-zero scenario shows oil demand peaking in 2025 and declining sharply after that — by 2030, oil demand will already be 30% lower than in 2019. This transition presents a significant challenge to the O&G sector. To remain attractive for investors, the industry must protect its current revenue and earnings, which means it will still have to invest in incumbent assets. But that won’t be enough. O&G companies must also take action to secure a profitable and significant role in the future energy system. 

To retain its dominance in the energy sector, O&G clearly will have to invest in renewable energy. However, controlling the supply chain will be much more complex for O&G companies as demand for energy carriers keeps diversifying.  

In this webinar, we will present five distinct strategies that O&G companies can adopt to remain dominant in energy while meeting their goals of carbon neutrality. 

Please Note:

  • A copy of the presentation slides and the webinar recording will be sent to all registrants after the webinar.
  • If you have any questions, please email webinars@luxresearchinc.com.

Presenter: Runeel Daliah, Principal Analyst at Lux Research

Runeel Daliah is a Principal Analyst at Lux Research and part of Lux’s Energy Transition team. He currently leads the group’s coverage of the decarbonization of the energy system, focusing on carbon capture and utilization and the hydrogen economy. In this role, he advises global energy and materials & chemicals companies as well as government organizations on the technical and regulatory drivers enabling the adoption of low-carbon technologies, drawing from extensive primary research with policymakers, academics, technology developers, and corporate stakeholders.

Runeel holds a master’s degree in chemical engineering from The University of Manchester in the United Kingdom.